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One of the most significant archaeological sites in Cyprus is the Archaeological Park of Kato Pafos (Paphos), which has been recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1980. In the late 4th century BC, Nicocles, the final King of Palaipafos, relocated the city to its current position near the harbor. From the 2nd century BC to the 4th century AD, Pafos served as the capital of Cyprus.

The park encompasses a range of sites and monuments spanning from the 4th century BC to the Middle Ages, with the majority of remains belonging to the Roman period. The highlight of the discoveries are the elaborate mosaic floors found in four Roman villas, specifically the houses of Dionysos, Theseus, Aion, and Orpheus. These mosaics depict various scenes from Greek Mythology and serve as a remarkable centerpiece.

Additionally, other important monuments within the complex include the Asklepieion, the Odeon, the Agora, the Saranta Kolones (Forty Columns) Castle, the ruins of an Early Christian Basilica at Limeniotissa, and the Tombs of the Kings.

Location: Kato Paphos, Paphos, Cyprus

Open: 16 September–15 April: daily from 8.30 am to 5 pm. 16 April–15 September: daily from 8.30 am to 7.30 pm

Phone: +357 26 306 217

Tombs of the Kings
PaphosCulture & History

Tombs of the Kings

A vast and scenic seaside necropolis.
Coral Bay
PaphosBeach

Coral Bay

Serene waters, golden sands, and vibrant beach life.
Agia Triada Beach
Ayia TriadaBeach

Agia Triada Beach

A serene blend of nature and facilities.